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Lucid Dreaming

Course Id 271129
Course Name Lucid Dreaming
Course Catagory Sleep
Course Price 36.95
Course CEU 3

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Define what is meant by the term “lucid dreaming”.
  • Explain what Freud thought about lucid dreaming.
  • Define what is meant by “prelucidity”.
  • Explain the role of interpretation in regard to lucid dreams.
  • Identify the role of lucid dreaming in traditional Navajo healing rituals.

Course Information

Lucid dreaming means dreaming while knowing that you are dreaming. The term was coined by Frederik van Eeden who used the word “lucid” in the sense of mental clarity. Lucidity usually begins in the midst of a dream when the dreamer realizes that the experience is not occurring in physical reality, but is a dream. Often this realization is triggered by the dreamer noticing some impossible or unlikely occurrence in the dream, such as flying or meeting the deceased. Sometimes people become lucid without noticing any particular clue in the dream; they just suddenly realize they are in a dream. A minority of lucid dreams (according to the research of LaBerge and colleagues, about 10 percent) are the result of returning to REM (dreaming) sleep directly from an awakening with unbroken reflective consciousness.

The basic definition of lucid dreaming requires nothing more than becoming aware that you are dreaming. However, the quality of lucidity can vary greatly. When lucidity is at a high level, you are aware that everything experienced in the dream is occurring in your mind, that there is no real danger, and that you are asleep in bed and will awaken shortly. With low-level lucidity you may be aware to a certain extent that you are dreaming, perhaps enough to fly or alter what you are doing, but not enough to realize that the people are dream representations, or that you can suffer no physical damage, or that you are actually in bed.

Lucidity is not synonymous with dream control. It is possible to be lucid and have little control over dream content, and conversely, to have a great deal of control without being explicitly aware that you are dreaming. However, becoming lucid in a dream is likely to increase the extent to which you can deliberately influence the course of events. Once lucid, dreamers usually choose to do something permitted only by the extraordinary freedom of the dream state, such as flying.

You always have the choice of how much control you want to exert. For example, you could continue with whatever you were doing when you became lucid, with the added knowledge that you are dreaming. Or you could try to change everything—the dream scene, yourself, other dream characters. It is not always possible to perform “magic” in dreams, like changing one object into another or transforming scenes. A dreamer’s ability to succeed at this seems to depend a lot on the dreamer’s confidence. As Henry Ford said, “Believe you can, believe you can’t; either way, you’re right.” On the other hand, it appears there are some constraints on dream control that may be independent of belief.